PSFF – Therapy

  • Individual: This therapy involves only the patient and the therapist.
  • Group: Two or more patients may participate in therapy at the same time. Patients are able to share experiences and learn that others feel the same way and have had the same experiences.
  • Marital/couples: This type of therapy helps spouses and partners understand why their loved one has a mental disorder, what changes in communication and behaviors can help, and what they can do to cope.
  • Family: Because family is a key part of the team that helps people with mental illness get better, it is sometimes helpful for family members to understand what their loved one is going through, how they themselves can cope, and what they can do to help.

Psychodynamic/Object Relations Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is based on the assumption that a person is having emotional problems because of unresolved, generally unconscious conflicts, often stemming from childhood. The goal of this type of therapy is for the patient to understand and cope better with these feelings by talking about the experiences. Psychodynamic therapy is administered over a period of three to four months, although it can last longer, even years.

Interpersonal Therapy

Interpersonal therapy focuses on the behaviors and interactions a patient has with family and friends. The primary goal of this therapy is to improve communication skills and increase self-esteem during a short period of time. It usually lasts three to four months and works well for depression caused by mourning, relationship conflicts, major life events, and social isolation.

Psychodynamic and interpersonal therapies help patients resolve mental illness caused by:

  • Loss (grief)
  • Relationship conflicts
  • Role transitions (such as becoming a mother, or a caregiver)

Cognitive-Behavioral/Mindfulness Therapy

Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps people with mental illness to identify and change inaccurate perceptions that they may have of themselves and the world around them. The therapist helps the patient establish new ways of thinking by directing attention to both   the “wrong” and “right” assumptions they make about themselves and others.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is recommended for patients:

  • Who think and behave in ways that trigger and perpetuate mental illness.
  • Who suffer from depression and/or anxiety disorders as the only treatment or, depending on the severity, in addition to treatment with antidepressant medication.
  • Who refuse or are unable to take antidepressant medication.
  • Of all ages who have mental illness that causes suffering, disability, or interpersonal problems.

Existential/Experiential

Existential means we begin wherever you currently are in your life. Who are you? At this moment, what are you thinking? What do you value? What is your reality?

Experiential means we will explore your understandings of yourself and the world you encounter. What is your experience? How does that translate into/impact the problems, issues or concerns that have brought you into therapy?

Jungian Therapy

Narrative Therapy

Post Modern Therapy

Solution Focused Therapy

Humanistic Therapy

Reality Therapy

Psychosocial Development (Erickson)

Grief and Loss Therapy

Gestalt

Humanistic or Person-Centered Therapy

Behavioral Therapy (Pavlov)

Family Systems Therapy

Strategic/Communication

Structural Family Therapy

Multi-Generation Family Therapy (Bowen)

Therapy Tips

Therapy works best when you attend all scheduled appointments. The effectiveness of  therapy depends on your active participation. It requires time, effort, and regularity.

As you begin therapy, establish some goals with your therapist. Then spend time periodically reviewing your progress with your therapist. If you don’t like the therapist’s approach or if you don’t think the therapist is helping you, talk to him or her about it and seek a second opinion if both agree, but don’t discontinue therapy abruptly.

Tips for Starting Therapy

Here are some tips to use when starting therapy for the first time:

  • Identify sources of stress: Try keeping a journal and note stressful as well as positive events.
  • Restructure priorities: Emphasize positive, effective behavior.
  • Make time for recreational and pleasurable activities.
  • Communicate: Explain and assert your needs to someone you trust; write in a journal to express your feelings.
  • Try to focus on positive outcomes and finding methods for reducing and managing stress.

Remember, therapy involves evaluating your thoughts and behaviors, identifying stresses that contribute to your condition, and working to modify both. People who actively participate in therapy recover more quickly and have fewer relapses.

Also, keep in mind, therapy is treatment that addresses specific causes of mental illness;  it is not a “quick fix.” It takes longer to begin to work than medication, but there is evidence to suggest that its effects last longer. Medication may be needed immediately in cases of severe mental illness, but the combination of therapy and medicine is very effective.

 Most insurances are covered.

We have male and female clinicians with a wide variety of specialties.

You Can browse through the clinicians or call our front office and ask a question.